depression

Negative and Competitive Interpersonal Stressors Linked to High Proinflammatory Cytokine Responses

Negative and Competitive Interpersonal Stressors Linked to High Proinflammatory Cytokine Responses

In a recent PNAS study, Jessica Chiang and colleagues from the Department of Psychology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, investigated the potential importance of negative, competitive and positive daily interactions on inflammatory activity. The authors of this study demonstrate that negative social interactions significantly predicted higher baseline levels of sTNFaRII […]

Psychological Stress and Cardiovascular Diseases: Overview of Clinical & Epidemiological Data

Psychological Stress and Cardiovascular Diseases: Overview of Clinical & Epidemiological Data

A review published in Postgraduate Medicine provides a comprehensive overview of the growing pool of clinical and epidemiological data concerning the association between psychological stress and cardiovascular disease, as well as the impact of cardiac rehabilitation and exercise therapy on psychological stress-related cardiovascular events. “Stress” is one of the most common patient complaints and up […]

Major Depressive Disorder, Immunoregulation, Inflammation and Our Changing Microbial Environment

Major Depressive Disorder, Immunoregulation, Inflammation and Our Changing Microbial Environment

Evolving Concepts Urbanized societies are suffering an epidemic of chronic inflammatory disorders such as allergies, autoimmunity and inflammatory bowel disease. This is at least partly due to elimination from the hygienic modern concrete and tarmac environment of microorganisms and helminths with which man co-evolved. These organisms needed to be tolerated, and so were “entrusted” by […]

The ‘Old Friends’ Hypothesis and Why Living in the Modern World May Increase Vulnerability to Major Depression

The ‘Old Friends’ Hypothesis and Why Living in the Modern World May Increase Vulnerability to Major Depression

In this paper, Raison et al. explore evidence that the ‘old friends’ theory, heretofore associated with allergic and autoimmune diseases, can also be applied to major depression. The ‘old friends’ theory suggests that immune interactions with pseudocommensal mycobacterial species, gut flora members and helminthes regulate the immune system, thus explaining lower rates of atopic (Th2-mediated) […]

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